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Old 25-06-19, 04:14 PM
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Corsair PCIe 4.0 NVMe MP600 is now available for pre-order

Up to 2TB of PCIe 4.0 NVMe power!



Read more about Corsair's PCIe 4.0 NVMe MP600 SSD becoming available for pre-order.

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Old 26-06-19, 06:13 AM
Bagpuss Bagpuss is offline
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So, just as were constantly being told that prices for SSD's are falling through the floor, manufacturers find an excuse to jack the prices back up.


..what a surprise .
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Old 26-06-19, 06:55 AM
NeverBackDown NeverBackDown is offline
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Originally Posted by Bagpuss View Post
So, just as were constantly being told that prices for SSD's are falling through the floor, manufacturers find an excuse to jack the prices back up.


..what a surprise .
It's very expensive to use PCIe 4.0. I'm not sure what else you could have expected? On top of that it will be a low volume product. Which further increases the price.
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Old 26-06-19, 08:39 AM
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Originally Posted by Bagpuss View Post
So, just as were constantly being told that prices for SSD's are falling through the floor, manufacturers find an excuse to jack the prices back up.


..what a surprise .
The price of NAND is falling, but this thing contains the world's first PCIe 4.0 controller and requires high-performance NAND to reach peak performance. Being top of the pack has always been expensive...
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Old 26-06-19, 09:46 AM
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I wonder will it outperform current drives in IOPS, small block sizes, and low queue depth tasks on PCIe 3.0 systems. That is where true performance of a drive is. Not it's max read/write speed. Intel Optane 905p is only 2600/2200 MB/s, R/W, and it blows away any other drive in all use case scenarios. I don't know why people, and reviewrs are not more focused on that type of performance. Max read/write doesn't do anything for you.
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Old 26-06-19, 02:34 PM
tgrech tgrech is offline
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I wonder will it outperform current drives in IOPS, small block sizes, and low queue depth tasks on PCIe 3.0 systems. That is where true performance of a drive is. Not it's max read/write speed. Intel Optane 905p is only 2600/2200 MB/s, R/W, and it blows away any other drive in all use case scenarios. I don't know why people, and reviewrs are not more focused on that type of performance. Max read/write doesn't do anything for you.
Because that's not really the case for most people. Those factors dominate when using an SSD as a scratch disk for applications or pagefiles, or synthetic benchmarks, but 95% of intensive consumer use cases for SSDs are literally just big sequential reads, this is why Optane has been mostly DOA besides for laptops where it's used so vendors can cheap out on actual memory.
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Old 26-06-19, 03:21 PM
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Because that's not really the case for most people. Those factors dominate when using an SSD as a scratch disk for applications or pagefiles, or synthetic benchmarks, but 95% of intensive consumer use cases for SSDs are literally just big sequential reads, this is why Optane has been mostly DOA besides for laptops where it's used so vendors can cheap out on actual memory.
You got it backwards m8. 95% of reads are NOT sequential. You get that only on file copy, and only for big files. And i didn't talk about 30GB Optane drives. Those are rubbish. I am talkig about 905p. The best and the baddest NVME for mortals.
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Old 26-06-19, 03:26 PM
tgrech tgrech is offline
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Not most reads, but most intensive reads. Most reads are pretty random but also low intensity and unlikely to really push the hardware in a way anyone would notice. You need intensive, random reads & writes to really make the most of Optane, and the only really common use case for that is a pagefile. A user will notice the IOPs & random performance difference in general use between a HDD and a SSD, but once you're at that point you're usually sub-milliseconds already so the performance gains of a high end SSD over a low end one could be orders of magnitudes higher but a user still now wouldn't notice anymore in low-intensity scenarios.

I think for a general user, Windows boots and loading up game level files or whatever are likely the cases where they'd notice the difference between a low end SSD and a high end one, and these arn't particularly intensive in terms of IOPs, they'd make use of more than a HDD could deliver but orders of magnitudes less than most SSDs.

TL;DR: If you have more than 10k IOPs already then a basic user is not going to see a huge jump in day to day tasks no matter how high you go.
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Old 26-06-19, 04:08 PM
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First of all you contradict yourself: "Because that's not really the case for most people. Those factors dominate when using an SSD as a scratch disk for applications or pagefiles, or synthetic benchmarks, but 95% of intensive consumer use cases for SSDs are literally just big sequential reads" That is the sole use of NVME drives. You won't buy NVME drive to store books, and media on it. Even those who don't know what NVME is benefit from it. And yes you can tell the difference between NVME, and SSD on fast system no matter how blunt you are.

Second: The average user that you describe is similar to my mother. She uses computer to send emails, search internet for cooking recipes, and to write teaching report. Those users don't know what NVME is, and don't search OC3D for answers. The ones who do know what it is are using it for above mentioned tasks, and don't care about sequential speed, and no one is reporting important data.

Third. Page file is basically non-existent. It is there to be a safeguard if you run out of RAM. You can disable it completely, and everything will be fine. There may be few apps that will complain that there is no page file but nah...

My point is that the most important aspects of drive's performance are not mentioned. I read, and watched countless reports from Computex and no one mentioned Gigabyte's drive IOPS, and that is 20% more than 905p. No one asked about low queue dept performance, or random performance. Everyone is shouting about 4GB + seq. read speed that you will never use or achieve.
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Old 26-06-19, 04:19 PM
tgrech tgrech is offline
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Windows leaned on the pagefile really heavily (Often in stupid ways) until recently if enabled and most people running modern games on 8GB systems will probably find it filling up rapidly though not leaned on for much too random in these cases, my definition of "most people" here is primarily people who mostly have expensive PCs to play games on them, which I'd think is most on internet communities like this, and the most performance intensive aspects someone would encounter day to day here would be Windows & game launches which nowadays are mostly just big 'ol sequential reads.
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