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Old 10-03-05, 10:06 AM
JN JN is offline
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What Linux Distro To Use?

The Better Known Distros

The ones in this group are probably the most popular for home users. They all have easy to use graphical installations and partitioning tools, as well as graphical configuration tools. Some hard core geeks look down on these point'n'click tools, but most of us have better things to do with our time than read documentation and wrestle with configuration files ..... All these use the RPM packaging system.
  • RedHat - The most popular of them all. Not my favourite desktop distro, but obviously zillions would disagree.... RedHat have a huge range of Linux products and services to suit a range of platforms and applications. RedHat now concentrate solely on products for their enterprise customers, and an offshoot named Fedora now handles the freely downloadable version for end-users.
  • SuSE - Very popular in Europe, full version includes literally thousands of apps. As well as Intel PCs, SuSE is also available for PowerPCs and other platforms.
  • Mandrake - One of my favourites. While it's promoted as being the ideal beginners distro, it's also very popular amongst more experienced users. Has one of the easiest installation and partitioning routines, plus some very polished configuration tools.

The Experienced Users Favourites

These distros inspire incredible loyalty. The installation routines are probably a little, um, challenging for the Linux virgin. All have a reputation for stability and efficiency.
  • Debian - Unusual for being a non-profit organization, and totally volunteer driven. Exceptionally stable, and having a brilliant package management system that automatically resolves dependencies. While the ease of use factor probably makes it less than ideal for a first timer, there have been a few Debian based distros that have addressed this issue (though for some reason, they don't seem to stay around for long).
  • Slackware - This one has been around for almost as long as Linux. A simple, "traditional" distro that stays out of the way, Slackware is the most "Unix-like" distro. Software installation is menu-based using tarballs (compressed archives)
  • Gentoo - Another similar distro that is becoming very popular. Like Debian and Slackware, Gentoo is probably more suited to experienced users than beginners. Gentoo is designed for extraordinary speed and flexibility, and uses an exceptionally sophisticated package management system that automatically resolves dependancies (like Debians' apt-get), and builds binaries optimized for your machine. If you are thinking of stepping up to a "hackers" distro, you should definitely check this one out.

The Compact Distros

While Linux can be small enough to fit on a floppy, or use in an embedded application, the compact distros listed here are complete enough for normal desktop use.
  • VectorLinux - A small distro (< 250mb installed), designed to be fast and simple. Features a lightweight desktop GUI and a range of software to handle most needs.
  • PeanutLinux - Another smallish (99mb download, 299mb installed) distro, unusual in that it can be installed into an existing FAT partition, as well as the more usual ext2 or reiser etc.
  • Crux - Crux is a lightweight, i686 optimized distro aimed at the more experienced user. It's primary focus is simplicity, and features a relatively small set of packages. It uses a tar.gz based package system.

Other Interesting Distros
  • Lindows - Lindows is a distro that emphasises ease of use for the Windows user. One of their advertised features is a subscription based service called Click-N-Run that allows users to easily download and install a variety of software packages. As Lindows is Debian based, users can also download the equivalent Debian packages from the Debian sites - at no cost. If you use Lindows, be sure to set up at least one user account for normal everyday use rather than running as root. Comes preloaded on some budget priced PCs at places like WalMart.
  • Lycoris - (formerly known as Redmond Linux) Another distro that aims for ease of use. Has a very well laid out GUI and an easy networking administration tool. Installation should be exceptionally quick and simple, with only one possible configuration. Includes a logical menu layout and a sensible selection of apps.
  • Knoppix - This is the best known of the distros that boot and run directly from the cd-rom, without having to install onto the hard drive. Useful for anyone wanting to try Linux without actually installing it. Comes with a suprisingly complete set of software, including and servers and other network tools as well as the usual desktop stuff. Debian based, Knoppix performs fairly well, though a little slower than a conventional distro. It can also be installed onto the hard disk, and this is an easy way to get an up to date Debian installed.
  • YellowDog - A RedHat based distro for the PowerPC.

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  #2  
Old 17-03-05, 06:33 PM
Dav0s Dav0s is offline
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what about ubuntu?? have the live cd and it is grrrrrreat :anisx:
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Old 17-03-05, 06:41 PM
JN JN is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by name='Dave'
what about ubuntu?? have the live cd and it is grrrrrreat :anisx:
Never heard of it....got a link?
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Old 17-03-05, 06:51 PM
Dav0s Dav0s is offline
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www.ubuntulinux.org
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Old 22-03-05, 03:38 PM
setite setite is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by name='Dave
[url']www.ubuntulinux.org[/url]
Dave you rock... your name is my name... well actually I dont respond to Dave... but David... and ubuntu rocks... disliked the livecd for warty because it was not really ubuntu and didnt work well on my pop's emachine... however it is a great OS... gonna install the 64-bit Hoary preview today... cheers
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Old 22-03-05, 03:40 PM
JN JN is offline
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Hi Setite...i never knew you joined. How you doing mate?
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Old 22-03-05, 04:36 PM
Dav0s Dav0s is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by name='setite'
Dave you rock... your name is my name... well actually I dont respond to Dave... but David... and ubuntu rocks... disliked the livecd for warty because it was not really ubuntu and didnt work well on my pop's emachine... however it is a great OS... gonna install the 64-bit Hoary preview today... cheers
im completely opposite. i prefer Dave not david.

anyway nice to have you on board setite i knew you were the ubuntu man so you couldnt be mroe perfect for this thread .

i am thinking of putting ubuntu on my computer but could do with somebody writing a guide to keep my current xp installation in the process. think you could do that setite??
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Old 22-03-05, 06:12 PM
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FragTek FragTek is offline
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Don't foget Fedora Core which is the new RedHat!
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Old 16-09-05, 03:42 PM
setite setite is offline
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wow im late... for anyone who needs to know... the fasttrack to a safe install is to defrag your pc... i prefer O&O Defrag Pro due to the fact that its faster than the windows one, and you can still use your computer while you defrag... also i've had a faulty linux install due to the windows defragger not fully defragging... and the norton partition magic(it used to be another company, drivequest i think, norton bought them) to partition the drive

ok so what i do is

delete the virtual paging file

restart pc

defragment harddrive

partition drive

- if you so choose you can actually set your root, boot, swap and all that.. but i dont... the only use I can see is if you have limited space and want to reduce the swap size... otherwise just use partition magic to resize your C: partition.. this will leave you with free, unallocated space at the end of the drive...

then reboot pc back into windows one last time in case it needs to run the partitioning app prior to teh windows install...

then reboot your pc with your linux install cd... and I would suggest that you, when the option comes up, let teh installer automatically partition the free space, the installers ive used are ubuntu, suse, fedora, and freebsd and all of them had the autopartition so I will assume they all do.

enjoy the good feeling of open source free software... and whatever you do... smoke a cigarette or drink a pepsi(my stress reliever) whenever your on linux because you are bound to break something if your not careful... linux is a struggle... it can be rewarding though

EDIT: Yea dont forget to restore your virtual paging file in windows after you install linux... or at least after your dont resizing the windows partition
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Old 16-09-05, 04:12 PM
limqareb limqareb is offline
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i ahve ubuntu on the amd and it rocks for internet browsing
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