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Old 09-09-09, 07:51 PM
PeterStoba PeterStoba is offline
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Intel Clarkdale CPU Prices Will Be Low

The new Clarkdale processors feature an intergrated graphics processor, and won't be so expensive.

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Old 09-09-09, 07:55 PM
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VonBlade VonBlade is offline
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Hmmm. It's about the price I'd have thought the i5 would come in at. Integrated graphics? Who on earth wants those?

(yes ok the business market, which is a big market, but still)
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Old 09-09-09, 11:34 PM
Bungral Bungral is offline
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Could be handy just to crack on if you suspect your beastly GFX card has died or something.

Hope these are cheap as I'll be looking to get the flagship dualie an clock the crap out of it.
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Old 10-09-09, 09:48 AM
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Rastalovich Rastalovich is offline
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Cheap cpu, aslong as u can get a cheap mobo, u got urself a stand alone. Real low power.
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Old 24-09-09, 06:05 AM
sujanne sujanne is offline
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What limits hard drive and CPU capacity? I'm wondering. We went from hard drives that could only hold megabytes, then we went to gigabytes, now we're moving towards terabytes and soon enough something that starts with a z. So what limits harddrive capacity, why can't it hold like trillions and trillions of gigabytes for example?

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Old 24-09-09, 09:13 AM
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I Hunta x I Hunta x is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by name='sujanne'
What limits hard drive and CPU capacity? I'm wondering. We went from hard drives that could only hold megabytes, then we went to gigabytes, now we're moving towards terabytes and soon enough something that starts with a z. So what limits harddrive capacity, why can't it hold like trillions and trillions of gigabytes for example?
Well tera is already near enough a standard in a year or 2 we probably wont be able to buy <1tb hard drives from alot of places

z? I assume you mean zetta (1000^7) the next logical step from tera would be peta (1000^5) then exa (1000^6) iirc.

From what i remember from looking around for this sorta info a while ago ill try to explain it as best i can (some of it could be wrong so dont hold me word for word on it).

What limits cpu speed is the transmission delay (the time it takes to charge/drain the tiny wire/transistor things on the chip) the smaller the wire the less time this takes, iirc this is directly linked to the speed of the chip (why the e5200 may just be the same as a e8400 but due to the tiny size of the connections flaws/errors may ocure while its being made thus slowing the transmission delay?).

There is also an of ammount time for it to flip states (on to off or off to on), as newer series of chips come around the transistor/wire chains get longer improving performance but why they start at slower speeds (thus why new series of chips start at lower speeds and faster ones come out later [for example the i7's started at 2.6 and have now moved up to 3.33 versions{i think}).

Also heat is a limit to speed, each time any of the wires/transistors change state they leak some electric thus creating heat (as the the transisitors get smaller they release less electricity/heat), and the faster the chips goes the more heat it puts out (ie the connectors are powering off and on more times a second releasing more charge).

Overclocking speeds up the time it takes to switch states thus creating yet more heat as its changing more often, and can cause errors by it trying to work faster than it can cause the quality of the connection (why you sometimes get errors on prime 95 and similar).

In the near future were going to be reaching the limits of cpu's/ram and not long after that hard drives probably at there current sizes because of physical size of the components not being able to get any smaller (Moores law)

--------------------

If you dont know moores law is the rate at which the the amount of transistors per icb (intergrated circuit board) grows withing feasable cost to make, It doubles roughly every 18-24 monets, tho this is a mainly a buisness practice (ie they want to draw it out and get more money from us for as long as possable imo).

As stated at the top, this is all from memory so i could be wrong (i hope its not as i just spent an hour odd typing it lol)

Tho to the hard drive size im not 100% sure but its something like a records gpi (grooves per inch) but its more like grooves per mm on a hard drive and why you have multiple platters(is that what there called?) in larger size hard drives, 2tb would be 6x320/4x 500 iirc (larger platters relates to seak time aswell iirc)
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Old 24-09-09, 01:05 PM
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Rastalovich Rastalovich is offline
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The limit of cpu speed - in basic terms, all points back to us going down the 8086 way of cpus in computers, or in other words, the pc runs as fast as as much clock speed u can bleed over the thing.

The more sensible architecture was based more, not totally, in better instruction sets. But we as consumers decided we didn't like companies who did that, even tho we would be in a better position now than we are.

Money rules that argument, and we're still inherently trying to get more and more use out of the same old 8086 that we had decades ago, without much relative improvement.

---------------

Limits on hard drive capacity on the physical side - well I don't personally believe there is one. SSDs yes there is as ur using address based "things" to store the info. Media tho - is basically magnetic stuff u record to, it's that fashion of recording that is ur limit and ur bound by whatever achievements u can make.

Hard drive limits for computers ? Technically there isn't one also, as u can always address beyond ur means with processors by switching addressing, or bank switching we used to call it.

Filesystems are limited, very limiting in some cases, not in others. There are good wiki tables on filesystem limits.

In a raw sense, u can write 1s and 0s to any media for as long as the media has space. Filesystems are what bind u tho.
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